States Press for Meaningful Regulation of Carbon Emissions from the Power Sector

May 21, 2018

The Clean Power Plan (CPP), issued under section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act, established a national rule to reduce carbon emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants, and was a key part of the Obama Administration’s strategy for meeting the U.S. commitment under the 2015 Paris Agreement.

On October 16, 2017, the Trump Administration’s EPA published a proposed rule to repeal the CPP. The public comment period for this proposal closed on April 26, 2018.

On December 28, 2017, the EPA issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) for a possible replacement for the CPP. The public comment period on the ANPRM closed on February 26, 2018.

In addition to the multi-state comment letters on the proposed repeal and ANPRM facilitated by Georgetown Climate Center, numerous states have submitted comments urging the EPA to preserve the CPP as is, or to otherwise ensure meaningful reductions of carbon pollution from the electric power sector. Below are links to those comments.

Comments on the proposed CPP Repeal were filed by the following states (or groups of states):

California Air Resources Board

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control

Maryland Attorney General

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and Department of Commerce

North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality

New York State Public Service Commission, Department of Environmental Conservation, and Energy Research and Development Authority

Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

Washington Department of Ecology and Department of Commerce

State Attorneys General from New York, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota (through the MPCA), New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington, and the District of Columbia

 

Comments on the ANPRM were filed by the following states (or groups of states):

California Air Resources Board

Colorado Department of Health and Environment

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and Department of Commerce

North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality

Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

Washington Department of Ecology

State Attorneys General from New York, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota [through the MPCA), New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington, and the District of Columbia