Ohio Climate and Energy Profile

View Ohio Adaptation Progress

Sources of Electricity Produced in
Ohio in 2016 1
Renewable Energy

The state has set a renewable energy standard of 12.5% by 2026. 2

Electricity Produced from Renewable Sources in 2016: 2.2% 3

Wind: 1.0% Solar: 0.2%
Hydro: 0.4% Biomass: 0.6%
Geothermal: 0%
Carbon Pollution Reduction

Change in Carbon Pollution from the Power Sector from 1990 to 2016:
26% reduction 4

Rate of Carbon Pollution for All Electricity Generating Sources in 2016: 1,513 pounds of CO2 emissions per megawatt hour generated 5

 

Electricity Production
and Consumption
Pollution Changes
and Intensity
Potential for
Cleaner Energy
Energy Efficiency
 
Regulatory Information
 

Electricity Generation by Fuel Source

The graph below displays annual electricity generation by fuel or resource type (e.g., coal, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar) in megawatt hours (MWh).

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of electricity generated by a source type in a given year. Click on a source type in the key below the graph to remove/add that source type to the graph.

Click on the "Compare to U.S. and Region" tab to view the percent change in different source types from 1990 to 2016 for the state, region, and the United States.

Compare to U.S. and Region
Changes Over Time

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Renewable Electricity Generation by Fuel Source

The graph below displays annual electricity generation by non-hydro renewable energy sources in megawatt hours (MWh). The first year when data was available for electricity generation from distributed solar was 2014.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of electricity generated by a source type in a given year. Click on a source type in the key below the graph to remove/add that source type to the graph.

 
Changes Over Time

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Quantity of Electricity Exported or Imported 

Total imported in 2016: 42,204,801 MWh

Ratio of Exports to Imports
Changes Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2017.

Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

 

Retail Electricity Prices 

Hover over the bars in the graph below to view the average retail electricity price per kilowatt hour in 2016 generated for each jurisdiction.

Compare to US and Region

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Spending on Electricity Relative to State Economic Activity 

Hover over the bars in the graph below to view the total retail electricity spending as a percent of the total economic activity (gross state or domestic product) for 2015 in the state, region, or United States.

Compare to US and Region

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Carbon Pollution in the Power Sector

2016 carbon emissions : 81,618,408 metric tons CO2
Carbon emission change from 1990 to 2016: -28,988,933 metric tons CO2
Percent change from 1990 to 2016: -26%

The graph below displays annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from the total electric power sector in the state. Hover over a data point below to view the amount of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in a given year.

Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in carbon pollution emitted between 1990 and 2016 as compared to the region and the United States.

% Change
Emissions Over Time

Reference Line

Change from reference level to : -26%

Reference Level

The default reference level (shown with the black line above) has been set to emissions in 1990. You can change this line on the graph either by choosing a different reference year or by manually entering an emissions level.

Change Reference Year

or

Enter Carbon Pollution Reference in Metric Tons:

COMPARISONS

US Economy-wide Goal, 28% below 2005 levels by 2025: 96,059,912 metric tons

Ohio’s Goal: Does not have goal

Ohio’s Clean Power Plan Goal: Interim Goal: 74,866,793 metric tons; Final Goal: 66,922,842 metric tons. This is equivalent to a 28% reduction from EPA’s 2012 baseline.

Applying to Ohio would result in an emissions target of: 82,955,506 metric tons

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Rate of Carbon Pollution in the Power Sector (All Sources)  

2016 carbon dioxide emissions rate: 1,513 lbs/MWh
Change in Carbon dioxide emission rate from 2005 to 2016: -361 lbs/MWh
Percent change from 2005 to 2016: -19.2%

The graph below displays annual CO2 emissions from the electric power sector divided by total megawatt hours of electricity generated (including non-emitting resources, such as renewable energy and nuclear generation resources), expressed in pounds CO2 emitted per megawatt hour of electricity generated (lbs CO2/ MWh).

Hover over a data point below to view the rate of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in any given year. Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in the carbon pollution rate from 2000 to 2016, as compared to the region and the United States.

% Change
Emissions Over Time

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Rate of Carbon Pollution in the Power Sector (Fossil Fuel Sources Only)  

2016 carbon dioxide emissions rate: 1,819 lbs/MWh
Change in Carbon dioxide emission rate from 2005 to 2016: -268 lbs/MWh
Percent change from 2005 to 2016: -12.8%

The graph below displays annual CO2 emissions from the electric power sector divided by megawatt hours of electricity generated from fossil-fuel fired electricity-generating resources only (i.e., coal, natural gas), expressed in pounds CO2 emitted per megawatt hour of electricity generated (lbs CO2 / MWh).

Hover over a data point below to view the rate of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in any given year. Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in the carbon pollution rate from 2000 to 2016, as compared to the region and the United States.

% Change
Emissions Over Time

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Pollution Intensity  

Hover over one of the bars in the graph below to view the 2016 sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx) emissions intensity for the state, the region, and the United States, expressed as pounds emitted per megawatt-hour of electricity generated. Click on the tabs below to change the view.

SO2 Intensity
NOx Intensity

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Source: EIA, 2017.

 

Renewable Energy Potential

The graph below displays the renewable energy technical potential from different renewable energy resources (e.g., wind, solar, geothermal, biomass) as a quantity of electricity that could be generated annually, in megawatt hours.

Technical potential represents the achievable energy generation of a particular technology given system performance, topographic limitations, environmental, and land-use constraints. It establishes an upper-boundary estimate of renewable energy development potential. These estimates were calculated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Potential

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Source: NREL, 2013.

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Natural Gas Generation Potential  

The graph below illustrates potential annual unused natural gas capacity in a states fleet of efficient combined-cycle natural gas power plants (in green), against the quantity of electricity generated from natural gas in the state in 2016 (in blue).

Potential unused natural gas capacity is estimated by subtracting the quantity of electricity generated in 2016 by combined-cycle natural gas power plants from a conservative estimate of overall generation capacity of those plants. This methodology was used in a series of reports developed by the World Resources Institute.

Current Use and Unused Capacity

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Source: EIA, 2017.

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Potential to Reduce Electricity Use through Combined Heat and Power  

The graph below displays the technical potential to reduce electricity use through combined generation of heat and power (CHP).

Technical potential estimates the potential for application of combined heat and power technologies based on technological considerations alone, expressed as the electricity generation capacity that could avoided because of CHP efficiency (in megawatts).

Technical capacity does not take into account of economic factors, and represents an upper bound of what might be possible.

These estimates are from a 2010 ICF International report.

Current vs. Potential

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Source: ICF International, 2010.

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ACEEE State Energy Efficiency Scores and Rankings

Area of Comparison Ohio Rank relative to U.S. State Score Average Regional Score Average U.S. Score
Utilities and benefits programs and policies 23 (Tied with 1) 5.50 (out of 20) 8.75 (out of 20) 6.18 (out of 20)
Transportation policies 45 (Tied with 6) 0.50 (out of 9) 2.58 (out of 9) 3.46 (out of 9)
Building energy codes 35 (Tied with 5) 3.00 (out of 7) 4.25 (out of 7) 4.40 (out of 7)
State government initiatives 20 (Tied with 7) 4.00 (out of 7) 4.08 (out of 7) 3.78 (out of 7)
Appliance efficiency standards 6 (Tied with 45) 0.00 (out of 2) 0.00 (out of 2) 0.09 (out of 2)
  Overall Rank: 30 (Tied with 2)

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Source: ACEEE, 2017.

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Industrial Energy Efficiency Spending

The graph below displays the percentage breakdown of 2010 industrial energy efficiency spending for the state, region, and the United States. Industrial energy efficiency spending includes incentives and rebates, grants, loans, technical assistance, energy audits and assessments, and a variety of other services that help encourage greater industrial energy efficiency. ARRA, one of the sources of industrial energy efficiency spending shown below, stands for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Click on "Per Unit of Consumption" to view total 2010 industrial energy efficiency spending relative to total industrial energy consumption, expressed as dollars spent on industrial energy efficiency per billion British Thermal Units of industrial energy consumption.

Revenue Source
Per Unit of Consumption

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Source: ACEEE, 2012.

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EIA Annual Electricity Savings

Changes Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2017.

 

State Utility Spending on Energy Efficiency

Changes Over Time

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Source: CEE, 2017.

 

Electricity Sector Regulation and Policy

This section provides a snapshot of key regulatory structures and renewable energy policies that vary among states.

Deregulation
Replacement of a monopoly system of electric utilities with competing sellers.

Yes

Retail Choice
A regulatory structure that enables retail customers to select among competing electricity providers.

Yes

Electricity Decoupling
Disassociation of a utilitys revenues from sales. The purpose of decoupling is to remove financial disincentives for regulated utilities to help their customers become more energy efficient.

yes

Gas Decoupling
Disassociation of a utilitys revenues from sales. The purpose of decoupling is to remove financial disincentives for regulated utilities to help their customers become more energy efficient.

no

 

Type of Renewable Energy Policy

 

 

Standard

 

Renewable Energy Target

Renewable portfolio standards (standard) require electric utilities to produce a specified percentage of their electricity from renewable sources like solar, wind, biomass, and geothermal.

Voluntary goals are non-binding programs based on a renewable energy target, often with financial incentives for utilities to make progress toward the target. Some states have voluntary goals on top on mandatory standards (standard and goal); for these states, the listed target percentage and year are for the mandatory standard. Other states have no standard or voluntary (none), so no target percentage or year is listed.

12.5% by 2026

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Source: DSIRE, 2018; EIA, 2013; C2ES 2016.