Vermont Climate and Energy Profile

View Vermont Adaptation Progress

The combustion of fossil fuels like petroleum, coal, and natural gas results in carbon pollution, which accounts for the vast majority of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Carbon pollution from energy use can be grouped by economic sector: Transportation, Electricity, Industrial, Residential, and Commercial. Electricity production from renewable sources accounts for the largest and fastest growing alternative to fossil fuel use.

Fuel Use 1
Carbon Pollution from Energy 4
Sources of Electricity Produced in Vermont in 2016 5

 

Energy Production
and Consumption
Air
Pollution
Energy
Potential
Clean
Vehicles
Energy Efficiency
 
Regulation and Policy
 

Fuel Use

This graph displays fuel use for all sectors by fuel type in billion megajoules (MJ).

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of energy by type of fuel in a given year. Click on a fuel type in the key below the graph to remove/add that fuel type to the graph.

Click on the "Compare to Other States/Regions" tab to view the difference in states’ fuel use in 2015.

Fuel Use

This graph displays fuel use for all sectors by fuel type in billion megajoules (MJ).

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of energy by type of fuel in a given year. Click on a fuel type in the key below the graph to remove/add that fuel type to the graph.

Click on the "Compare to Other States/Regions" tab to view the difference in states’ fuel use in 2015.

Changes Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2017

Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Fuel Use (per capita)

This graph displays fuel use per capita for all sectors. Data accounts for all types of fuel use from all sectors, divided by population (megajoules (MJ), per capita).

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of fuel used per person in the state in a given year.

Click on the "Compare to Other States/Regions" tab to view the difference in states’ fuel use per capita in 2015.

Fuel Use (per capita)

This graph displays fuel use per capita for all sectors. Data accounts for all types of fuel use from all sectors, divided by population (megajoules (MJ), per capita).

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of fuel used per person in the state in a given year.

Click on the "Compare to Other States/Regions" tab to view the difference in states’ fuel use per capita in 2015.

Changes Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2017. U.S Census, 2016.

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Transportation Energy (by fuel)

This graph displays energy use in the transportation sector, by type of transportation fuel, in billion megajoules (MJ). Over the past decade, the vast majority of gasoline consumed in the United States contains some ethanol.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of transportation energy by fuel type in a given year. Click on a fuel type in the key below the graph to remove/add that transportation fuel type.

Transportation Energy (by fuel)

This graph displays energy use in the transportation sector, by type of transportation fuel, in billion megajoules (MJ). Over the past decade, the vast majority of gasoline consumed in the United States contains some ethanol.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of transportation energy by fuel type in a given year. Click on a fuel type in the key below the graph to remove/add that transportation fuel type.

Consumption Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2017

 

Crude Oil Production

This graph displays annual crude oil production in billion megajoules (MJ). Most crude oil produced and consumed domestically is used for transportation purposes.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of crude oil produced in the state in a given year.

Click on the "Compare to Other States/Regions" tab to view the difference in states’ crude oil production in 2015.

Crude Oil Production

This graph displays annual crude oil production in billion megajoules (MJ). Most crude oil produced and consumed domestically is used for transportation purposes.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of crude oil produced in the state in a given year.

Click on the "Compare to Other States/Regions" tab to view the difference in states’ crude oil production in 2015.

Changes Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2017

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Electricity Generation (by fuel source)

This graph displays annual electricity generation by fuel or resource type (e.g., coal, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar) in megawatt hours (MWh).

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of electricity generated by a source type in a given year. Click on a source type in the key below the graph to remove/add that source type to the graph.

Click on the "Compare to U.S. and Region" tab to view the percent change in different source types from 2005 to 2015 for the state, region, and the United States.

Electricity Generation (by fuel source)

This graph displays annual electricity generation by fuel or resource type (e.g., coal, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar) in megawatt hours (MWh).

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of electricity generated by a source type in a given year. Click on a source type in the key below the graph to remove/add that source type to the graph.

Click on the "Compare to U.S. and Region" tab to view the percent change in different source types from 2005 to 2015 for the state, region, and the United States.

Compare to U.S. and Region
Changes Over Time

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For use in a presentation or report, click here for citation.

Source: EIA, 2016.

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Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Renewable Electricity Generation (by fuel source)

This graph displays annual electricity generation by non-hydro renewable energy sources in megawatt hours (MWh). The first year when data was available for electricity generation from distributed solar was 2014.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of electricity generated by a source type in a given year. Click on a source type in the key below the graph to remove/add that source type to the graph.

Renewable Electricity Generation (by fuel source)

This graph displays annual electricity generation by non-hydro renewable energy sources in megawatt hours (MWh). The first year when data was available for electricity generation from distributed solar was 2014.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of electricity generated by a source type in a given year. Click on a source type in the key below the graph to remove/add that source type to the graph.

Changes Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2016.

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Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Electricity Consumption

This graph displays the amount of electricity consumed in a state per year. Data is for all enduses of electricity. Quantity of electricity consumed is expressed in megawatt-hours (MWh).

Hover over a data point to view about the quantity of electricity consumption in a given year.

Electricity Consumption

This graph displays the amount of electricity consumed in a state per year. Data is for all enduses of electricity. Quantity of electricity consumed is expressed in megawatt-hours (MWh).

Hover over a data point to view about the quantity of electricity consumption in a given year.

Changes Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2017

Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Electricity Exported or Imported

Total exported in 2016: 4,998,464 MWh

This graph shows the net quantity of electricity exported from a state (a negative data point represents the quantity imported), based on the state’s net electricity production and consumption. Quantity of net exports or imports is expressed in megawatt-hours (MWh).

Hover over a data point to view more information about electricity exports or imports in a given year.

Click on the "Ratio of Exports to Imports" tab to compare the ratio of electricity produced (i.e., the electricity produced divided by the energy consumed) in 2015 for the state to the regional average. Numbers above the solid black line (at 1 on the X axis) indicate net export, while numbers below the solid black line indicated net import.

Electricity Exported or Imported

Total exported in 2016: 4,998,464 MWh

This graph shows the net quantity of electricity exported from a state (a negative data point represents the quantity imported), based on the state’s net electricity production and consumption. Quantity of net exports or imports is expressed in megawatt-hours (MWh).

Hover over a data point to view more information about electricity exports or imports in a given year.

Click on the "Ratio of Exports to Imports" tab to compare the ratio of electricity produced (i.e., the electricity produced divided by the energy consumed) in 2015 for the state to the regional average. Numbers above the solid black line (at 1 on the X axis) indicate net export, while numbers below the solid black line indicated net import.

Ratio of Exports to Imports
Changes Over Time

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For use in a presentation or report, click here for citation.

Source: EIA, 2016.

Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Retail Electricity Prices

Hover over the bars in the graph below to view the average retail electricity price per kilowatt hour in 2015 generated for each jurisdiction.

Retail Electricity Prices

Hover over the bars in the graph below to view the average retail electricity price per kilowatt hour in 2015 generated for each jurisdiction.

Compare to US and Region

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Source: EIA, 2016.

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Spending on Electricity (% of GDP)

Hover over the bars in the graph below to view the total retail electricity spending as a percent of the total economic activity (gross state or domestic product) for 2015 in the state, region, or United States.

Spending on Electricity (% of GDP)

Hover over the bars in the graph below to view the total retail electricity spending as a percent of the total economic activity (gross state or domestic product) for 2015 in the state, region, or United States.

Compare to US and Region

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Source: EIA, 2016; BEA 2016.

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Carbon Pollution from Energy

This graph displays the annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from all fuel types by economic sector.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted from a sector in a given year. Click on a sector in the key below the graph to remove/add that sector.

Click on the "Compare to Other States/Regions" tab to view the difference in states’ carbon pollution from energy in 2015.

Carbon Pollution from Energy

This graph displays the annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from all fuel types by economic sector.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted from a sector in a given year. Click on a sector in the key below the graph to remove/add that sector.

Click on the "Compare to Other States/Regions" tab to view the difference in states’ carbon pollution from energy in 2015.

Emissions Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2017.

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Carbon Pollution from Energy vs GDP

This graph compares the total annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from all fuel types to the state’s gross domestic product (GDP) over time.  While emissionshave historically tracked closely with GDP, in many states these trends have been more divergent since the beginning of the 21st century.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted compared to GDP. Click on a category in the key below the graph to remove/add that data.

Carbon Pollution from Energy vs GDP

This graph compares the total annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from all fuel types to the state’s gross domestic product (GDP) over time.  While emissionshave historically tracked closely with GDP, in many states these trends have been more divergent since the beginning of the 21st century.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted compared to GDP. Click on a category in the key below the graph to remove/add that data.

CO2 vs. GDP

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Source: EIA, 2017. BEA, 2017.

 

Carbon Pollution from Transportation Energy vs GDP

This graph compares the total annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from the transportation sector to the state’s gross domestic product (GDP) over time.  While emissions have historically tracked closely with GDP, in many states these trends have been more divergent since the beginning of the 21st century.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted from transportation compared to GDP. Click on a category in the key below the graph to remove/add that data.

Carbon Pollution from Transportation Energy vs GDP

This graph compares the total annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from the transportation sector to the state’s gross domestic product (GDP) over time.  While emissions have historically tracked closely with GDP, in many states these trends have been more divergent since the beginning of the 21st century.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted from transportation compared to GDP. Click on a category in the key below the graph to remove/add that data.

CO2 vs. GDP

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Source: EIA, 2017. BEA, 2017.

 

Carbon Pollution from Electric Energy vs GDP

This graph compares the total annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from the electric power sector to the state’s gross domestic product (GDP).  While emissions have historically tracked closely with GDP, in many states these trends have been more divergent since the beginning of the 21st century.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted from electricity compared to GDP. Click on a category in the key below the graph to remove/add that data.

Carbon Pollution from Electric Energy vs GDP

This graph compares the total annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from the electric power sector to the state’s gross domestic product (GDP).  While emissions have historically tracked closely with GDP, in many states these trends have been more divergent since the beginning of the 21st century.

Hover over a data point to view the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted from electricity compared to GDP. Click on a category in the key below the graph to remove/add that data.

CO2 vs. GDP

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Source:EIA, 2017. BEA, 2017.

 

Carbon Pollution from the Electricity Sector

2016 carbon emissions : 11,526 metric tons CO2
Carbon emission change from 1990 to 2016: -29,343 metric tons CO2
Percent change from 1990 to 2016: -72%

This graph displays annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from the total electric power sector in the state. Hover over a data point below to view the amount of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in a given year.

Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in carbon pollution emitted between 1990 and 2015 as compared to the region and the United States.

Carbon Pollution from the Electricity Sector

2016 carbon emissions : 11,526 metric tons CO2
Carbon emission change from 1990 to 2016: -29,343 metric tons CO2
Percent change from 1990 to 2016: -72%

This graph displays annual metric tons of CO2 emissions from the total electric power sector in the state. Hover over a data point below to view the amount of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in a given year.

Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in carbon pollution emitted between 1990 and 2015 as compared to the region and the United States.

% Change
Emissions Over Time

Reference Line

Change from reference level to : -72%

Reference Level

The default reference level (shown with the black line above) has been set to emissions in 1990. You can change this line on the graph either by choosing a different reference year or by manually entering an emissions level.

Change Reference Year

or

Enter Carbon Pollution Reference in Metric Tons:

COMPARISONS

US Economy-wide Goal, 28% below 2005 levels by 2025: 9,873 metric tons

Vermont’s Goal: 50% below 1990 levels by 2028, 75% below 1990 levels by 2050.

Vermont’s Clean Power Plan Goal: Interim Goal: 0 metric tons; Final Goal: 0 metric tons. .

Applying to Vermont would result in an emissions target of: 30,652 metric tons

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Source: EIA, 2016.

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Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Carbon Pollution Rate for the Electricity Sector (All Sources)

2016 carbon dioxide emissions rate: 13 lbs/MWh
Change in Carbon dioxide emission rate from 2005 to 2016: 8 lbs/MWh
Percent change from 2005 to 2016: 151.4%

This graph displays annual CO2 emissions from the electric power sector divided by total megawatt hours of electricity generated (including non-emitting resources, such as renewable energy and nuclear generation resources), expressed in pounds CO2 emitted per megawatt hour of electricity generated (lbs CO2/ MWh).

Hover over a data point below to view the rate of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in any given year. Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in the carbon pollution rate from 2005 to 2015, as compared to the region and the United States.

Carbon Pollution Rate for the Electricity Sector (All Sources)

2016 carbon dioxide emissions rate: 13 lbs/MWh
Change in Carbon dioxide emission rate from 2005 to 2016: 8 lbs/MWh
Percent change from 2005 to 2016: 151.4%

This graph displays annual CO2 emissions from the electric power sector divided by total megawatt hours of electricity generated (including non-emitting resources, such as renewable energy and nuclear generation resources), expressed in pounds CO2 emitted per megawatt hour of electricity generated (lbs CO2/ MWh).

Hover over a data point below to view the rate of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in any given year. Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in the carbon pollution rate from 2005 to 2015, as compared to the region and the United States.

% Change
Emissions Over Time

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For use in a presentation or report, click here for citation.

Source: EIA, 2016.

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Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Carbon Pollution Rate for the Electricity Sector (fossil fuel sources only)

2016 carbon dioxide emissions rate: 4,248 lbs/MWh
Change in Carbon dioxide emission rate from 2005 to 2016: 1,813 lbs/MWh
Percent change from 2005 to 2016: 74.5%

This graph displays annual CO2 emissions from the electric power sector divided by megawatt hours of electricity generated from fossil fuel-fired electricity-generating resources only (i.e., coal, natural gas), expressed in pounds CO2 emitted per megawatt hour of electricity generated (lbs CO2 / MWh).

Hover over a data point below to view the rate of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in any given year. Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in the carbon pollution rate from 2005 to 2015, as compared to the region and the United States.

Carbon Pollution Rate for the Electricity Sector (fossil fuel sources only)

2016 carbon dioxide emissions rate: 4,248 lbs/MWh
Change in Carbon dioxide emission rate from 2005 to 2016: 1,813 lbs/MWh
Percent change from 2005 to 2016: 74.5%

This graph displays annual CO2 emissions from the electric power sector divided by megawatt hours of electricity generated from fossil fuel-fired electricity-generating resources only (i.e., coal, natural gas), expressed in pounds CO2 emitted per megawatt hour of electricity generated (lbs CO2 / MWh).

Hover over a data point below to view the rate of carbon pollution emitted from the electricity sector in any given year. Click on the "% Change" tab to view the percent change in the carbon pollution rate from 2005 to 2015, as compared to the region and the United States.

% Change
Emissions Over Time

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For use in a presentation or report, click here for citation.

Source: EIA, 2016.

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Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Electricity Sector Criteria Pollutant Intensity

Hover over one of the bars in this graph to view the 2015 sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx) emissions intensity for the state, the region, and the United States, expressed as pounds emitted per megawatt-hour of electricity generated. Click on the tabs below to change the view.

Electricity Sector Criteria Pollutant Intensity

Hover over one of the bars in this graph to view the 2015 sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx) emissions intensity for the state, the region, and the United States, expressed as pounds emitted per megawatt-hour of electricity generated. Click on the tabs below to change the view.

SO2 Intensity
NOx Intensity

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For use in a presentation or report, click here for citation.

Source: EIA, 2016.

 

Renewable Energy Potential

This graph displays the renewable energy technical potential from different renewable energy resources (e.g., wind, solar, geothermal, biomass) as a quantity of electricity that could be generated annually, in megawatt hours.

Technical potential represents the achievable energy generation of a particular technology given system performance, topographic limitations, environmental, and land-use constraints. It establishes an upper-boundary estimate of renewable energy development potential. These estimates were calculated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Renewable Energy Potential

This graph displays the renewable energy technical potential from different renewable energy resources (e.g., wind, solar, geothermal, biomass) as a quantity of electricity that could be generated annually, in megawatt hours.

Technical potential represents the achievable energy generation of a particular technology given system performance, topographic limitations, environmental, and land-use constraints. It establishes an upper-boundary estimate of renewable energy development potential. These estimates were calculated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Potential

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Source: NREL, 2013.

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Natural Gas Generation Potential

This graph illustrates potential annual unused natural gas capacity in a state’s fleet of efficient combined-cycle natural gas power plants (in green), against the quantity of electricity generated from natural gas in the state in 2015 (in blue).

Potential unused natural gas capacity is estimated by subtracting the quantity of electricity generated in 2015 by combined-cycle natural gas power plants from a conservative estimate of overall generation capacity of those plants. This methodology was used in a series of reports developed by the World Resources Institute.

Natural Gas Generation Potential

This graph illustrates potential annual unused natural gas capacity in a state’s fleet of efficient combined-cycle natural gas power plants (in green), against the quantity of electricity generated from natural gas in the state in 2015 (in blue).

Potential unused natural gas capacity is estimated by subtracting the quantity of electricity generated in 2015 by combined-cycle natural gas power plants from a conservative estimate of overall generation capacity of those plants. This methodology was used in a series of reports developed by the World Resources Institute.

Current Use and Unused Capacity

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Source: EIA, 2016.

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Zero Emission Vehicle Sales

State-Established Zero Emission Vehicle Goal: None I
Cumulative Zero Emission Vehicle Sales: 2,483 II

This graph displays the cumulative number of zero emission vehicles (ZEVs) sold in the state from 2011 through 2017 per 100,000 people, compared to the regional and United States averages.  Zero-emission vehicles include battery-electric, plug-in hybrid electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles.

Zero Emission Vehicle Sales

State-Established Zero Emission Vehicle Goal: None I
Cumulative Zero Emission Vehicle Sales: 2,483 II

This graph displays the cumulative number of zero emission vehicles (ZEVs) sold in the state from 2011 through 2017 per 100,000 people, compared to the regional and United States averages.  Zero-emission vehicles include battery-electric, plug-in hybrid electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles.

Compare to U.S. and Region

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Source: Auto Alliance, 2018.

Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

Electric Vehicle Charging Ports

Number of Fast-Charging Ports: 55 III
Number of Public Level 2 Charging Ports: 309 IV

The graph displays the number of public fast-charging and level 2 ports for charging electric vehiclesper 100,000 people, compared to the regional and United States averages. Public level 2 ports are more common than fast-charging ports. While most vehicle charging currently occurs at home or at work, a network of public charging stations is necessary to enable long-distance travel and provide additional options for drivers without home charging. A single charging station may have multiple ports, allowing multiple vehicles to recharge simultaneously. AC Level 2 charging stations add 10 to 20 miles of driving range per 1 hour of charging.  DC fast charging stations add, on average, 60 to 80 miles of driving range per 20 minutes of charging.

Electric Vehicle Charging Ports

Number of Fast-Charging Ports: 55 III
Number of Public Level 2 Charging Ports: 309 IV

The graph displays the number of public fast-charging and level 2 ports for charging electric vehiclesper 100,000 people, compared to the regional and United States averages. Public level 2 ports are more common than fast-charging ports. While most vehicle charging currently occurs at home or at work, a network of public charging stations is necessary to enable long-distance travel and provide additional options for drivers without home charging. A single charging station may have multiple ports, allowing multiple vehicles to recharge simultaneously. AC Level 2 charging stations add 10 to 20 miles of driving range per 1 hour of charging.  DC fast charging stations add, on average, 60 to 80 miles of driving range per 20 minutes of charging.

Compare to U.S. and Region

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Source: DOE AFDC, 2018. U.S Census, 2016.

Compare to All States > Compare to Other States/Regions >

 

I. Global Automakers. “Driving ZEV.” December 2017. http://www.drivingzev.com/zev-101 .

 

II. Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers. “Advanced Technology Vehicle Sales Dashboard.” March 2018. https://autoalliance.org/energy-environment/advanced-technology-vehicle-sales-dashboard/ .

 

III. U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center, "Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations." January 29, 2018, https://www.afdc.energy.gov/fuels/electricity_locations.html .

 

IV. U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center, "Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations." January 29, 2018, https://www.afdc.energy.gov/fuels/electricity_locations.html .

 

ACEEE State Energy Efficiency Scores and Rankings

The rankings and raw scores below are from the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy’s (ACEEE) 2016 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard.

Raw scores are presented with highest possible score in parentheses (higher scores represent a higher level of energy efficiency policy). Rankings are based on raw scores as compared to other states. The table also lists the average score for the region and the United States. Rankings are based on year 2015 data.

Area of Comparison Vermont Rank relative to U.S. State Score Average Regional Score Average U.S. Score
Utilities and benefits programs and policies 3 18.00 (out of 20) 15.33 (out of 20) 6.18 (out of 20)
Transportation policies 10 6.00 (out of 9) 5.75 (out of 9) 3.46 (out of 9)
Building energy codes 5 (Tied with 3) 7.00 (out of 7) 5.33 (out of 7) 4.40 (out of 7)
State government initiatives 7 (Tied with 5) 5.50 (out of 7) 5.08 (out of 7) 3.78 (out of 7)
Appliance efficiency standards 3 (Tied with 2) 0.50 (out of 2) 0.08 (out of 2) 0.09 (out of 2)
  Overall Rank: 4

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Source: ACEEE, 2016.

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EIA Annual Electricity Savings

This line chart is an estimate made by EIA of the state’s annual electricity savings due to energy efficiency, versus a business as usual expected consumption of electricity.

EIA Annual Electricity Savings

This line chart is an estimate made by EIA of the state’s annual electricity savings due to energy efficiency, versus a business as usual expected consumption of electricity.

Changes Over Time

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Source: EIA, 2016.

 

State’s Utilities’ Spending on Energy Efficiency

This line chart is the total of the state’s utilities’ spending on energy efficiency from 2009 to 2015, as compiled by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency.

State’s Utilities’ Spending on Energy Efficiency

This line chart is the total of the state’s utilities’ spending on energy efficiency from 2009 to 2015, as compiled by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency.

Changes Over Time

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Source: CEE, 2016.

 

Regulation and Policy

This section provides a snapshot of key regulatory structures and renewable energy policies that vary among states.

Deregulation
Replacement of a monopoly system of electric utilities with competing sellers.

No

Retail Choice
A regulatory structure that enables retail customers to select among competing electricity providers.

No

Electricity Decoupling
Disassociation of a utility’s revenues from sales. The purpose of decoupling is to remove financial disincentives for regulated utilities to help their customers become more energy efficient.

yes

Gas Decoupling
Disassociation of a utility’s revenues from sales. The purpose of decoupling is to remove financial disincentives for regulated utilities to help their customers become more energy efficient.

no

Zero Emission Vehicle standards?

Yes

 

Type of Renewable Energy Policy

 

 

Standard

 

Renewable Energy Target

Renewable portfolio standards (standard) require electric utilities to produce a specified percentage of their electricity from renewable sources like solar, wind, biomass, and geothermal.

Voluntary goals are non-binding programs based on a renewable energy target, often with financial incentives for utilities to make progress toward the target. Some states have voluntary goals on top on mandatory standards (standard and goal); for these states, the listed target percentage and year are for the mandatory standard. Other states have no standard or voluntary (none), so no target percentage or year is listed.

20% by 2017

State-Established Zero Emission Vehicle Goal

None

For use in a presentation or report, click here for citation.

Source: EIA, 2013.

 

1. Aggregated from the following for 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration. “Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source: 1990-2015.” State Historical Tables EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923. http://www.eia.gov/electricity/data/state/ (accessed December 5, 2016).

 

2. Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency. “Renewable Portfolio Standard Policies.” Summary Maps. 2016. http://www.dsireusa.org/resources/detailed-summary-maps/ (accessed December 1, 2016).

 

3. U.S. Energy Information Administration. “Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source: 1990-2015.” State Historical Tables EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923. http://www.eia.gov/electricity/data/state/ (accessed December 5, 2016).

 

4. U.S. Energy Information Administration. “U.S. Electric Power Industry Estimated Emissions by State: 1990-2015.” State Historical Tables EIA-767, EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923. http://www.eia.gov/electricity/data/state/ (accessed December 5, 2016).

 

5. Emissions data from U.S. Energy Information Administration. “U.S. Electric Power Industry Estimated Emissions by State: 1990-2015.” State Historical Tables EIA-767, EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923. http://www.eia.gov/electricity/data/state/ (accessed December 5, 2016). Generation data from U.S. Energy Information Administration. “Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source: 1990-2015.” State Historical Tables EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923. http://www.eia.gov/electricity/data/state/ (accessed December 6, 2016).